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nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)

Mongolian death worm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   

oneheadtoanother:

The Mongolian death worm (Mongolian: олгой-хорхой, olgoi-khorkhoi, “large intestine worm”) is an alleged creature reported to exist in the Gobi Desert. It is generally considered a cryptid: an animal whose sightings and reports are disputed or unconfirmed.
It is described as a bright red worm with a wide body that is 2 to 5 feet (0.6 to 1.5 m) long.[1][2]
The worm is the subject of a number of claims by Mongolian locals - such as the ability of the worm to spew forth an acid that, on contact, will turn anything it touches yellow and corroded (and which would kill a human),[3] as well as its reported ability to kill at a distance by means of electric discharge.[1][3]

quagmath:

George Washingtoad was a Toad in The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! in The Koopas Are Coming! The Koopas Are Coming!. Mario, Luigi, Princess Toadstool and Toad helped him fight King Koopa and his Koopa Troop. He is a general for the thirteen Mushroom Colonies.

He is an obvious spoof of George Washington, the revolutionary war general and first president of the United States of America. Also, unlike all the Toads in the cartoon, he has hair and a nose.

oneheadtoanother:

Sculptural Book Ads for Dutch Book Week

A series of print ads for Dutch Book Week by Van Wanten Etcetera. This years theme was the “autobiography”, so 3D portraits of Anne Frank, Vincent van Gogh, Louis van Gaal and Kader Abdollah were created from books as centerpieces for the ad campaign. Despite how striking the ads are I have to admit that they were digitally produced, and in an age when anything can be realistically created with computers I tend to get more excited about the real thing, like the works of Julia Feld. That said, the artists for this campaign clearly spent lots of time focusing on the fine details, as even the text used on the pages came from the actual books. Digital or not, this is a lovely campaign. (via behance)

dailyfossil:

Indohyus
Reconstruction by Carl Buell.
When: Eocene (~48 million years old)
Where: India and Pakistan
What: Indohyus is a fossil artiodactyl that falls on the lineage leading to whales. The discovery of an almost complete specimen Indohyus helped to answer one of the long standing questions in the early evolution of whales. All living whales are carnivorous (with diets ranging from vertebrate prey to tiny invertebrates), however, all other living artiodactyls are predominately herbivorous. As all fossils assuredly related to whales showed both aquatic and carnivorous adaptations, it was a mystery as to which came first in the evolution of the cetaceans. Enter Indohyus. This fossil lacks any carnivorous adaptions in its dentition, but has several adaptations for spending time submerged - most notable are an ear region that looks a lot like that of previously known fossil whale ancestors and bones with increased density. These features would have allowed the animal to hear better underwater and to stay submerged easier, respectively. Isotopic analysis of its dentition and bones suggests that Indohyus spent a good amount of time in waters, but fed on land plants - much like the modern Hippopotomus. It has been suggested Indohyus fled to the water to avoid predators, like the modern African Mousedeer, which has been documented spending almost five minutes underwater to escape predation. Indohyus  was about 3 feet (~1 meter) long from end to end, thus it would have had many potential predators in the early Eocene world. 
Phylogenetic analysis place Indohyus at the base of what have traditionally been referred to as ‘archaeocetes’; a paraphyletic lineage of fossils more closely related to whales than to hippos. The term Cetaceamorpha is used for the group that includes all living whales and all fossils more closely related to them than to the hippos. Falling very near Indohyus is an animal called Diacodexis. I will highlight this animal more in a future entry, but to be brief it shows none of the aquatic adaptions of Indohyus, but has simular dentition. Thus, the current hypothesis of basal whale evolution is that small deer-like animals first went into the water, possibly for protection from predators, and then later became carnivorous. 
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dailyfossil:

Indohyus

Reconstruction by Carl Buell.

When: Eocene (~48 million years old)

Where: India and Pakistan

What: Indohyus is a fossil artiodactyl that falls on the lineage leading to whales. The discovery of an almost complete specimen Indohyus helped to answer one of the long standing questions in the early evolution of whales. All living whales are carnivorous (with diets ranging from vertebrate prey to tiny invertebrates), however, all other living artiodactyls are predominately herbivorous. As all fossils assuredly related to whales showed both aquatic and carnivorous adaptations, it was a mystery as to which came first in the evolution of the cetaceans. Enter Indohyus. This fossil lacks any carnivorous adaptions in its dentition, but has several adaptations for spending time submerged - most notable are an ear region that looks a lot like that of previously known fossil whale ancestors and bones with increased density. These features would have allowed the animal to hear better underwater and to stay submerged easier, respectively. Isotopic analysis of its dentition and bones suggests that Indohyus spent a good amount of time in waters, but fed on land plants - much like the modern Hippopotomus. It has been suggested Indohyus fled to the water to avoid predators, like the modern African Mousedeer, which has been documented spending almost five minutes underwater to escape predation. Indohyus  was about 3 feet (~1 meter) long from end to end, thus it would have had many potential predators in the early Eocene world. 

Phylogenetic analysis place Indohyus at the base of what have traditionally been referred to as ‘archaeocetes’; a paraphyletic lineage of fossils more closely related to whales than to hippos. The term Cetaceamorpha is used for the group that includes all living whales and all fossils more closely related to them than to the hippos. Falling very near Indohyus is an animal called Diacodexis. I will highlight this animal more in a future entry, but to be brief it shows none of the aquatic adaptions of Indohyus, but has simular dentition. Thus, the current hypothesis of basal whale evolution is that small deer-like animals first went into the water, possibly for protection from predators, and then later became carnivorous. 

Mother, ACLU sue Border Patrol over shooting      

U.S. Border Patrol agents who killed a Mexican teenager should be brought to justice, a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday argues, claiming the agents used excessive force when they opened fire.

Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez, 16, was shot dead and found face-down in a pool of his own blood on the Mexican side of the border in October 2012.

At the time of the shooting, the U.S. Border Patrol said agents in Nogales, Arizona, opened fire after people on the Mexican side hurled rocks their way.

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